Tag : wachowski

Woodkid-2013-Photo-by-Mathieu-Cesar-560x432Transform day Today

Transform day Today

Daca ar fi sa ti schimbi astazi ziua, din ce te-ai inspira?

Iata filmele si muzicile care-l inspira pe un artist minunat Woodkid – intimplator (cu o singura exceptie) toate celelalte alegeri ale lui sunt si pe lista mea de preferinte.

1. Steven Spielberg

“The filmmakers I watched when I was a kid were big, mainstream directors like Spielberg or Stanley Kubrick – the only ones I would have access to as a little kid growing up in the middle of France. With Spielberg, it was about how his subjects were treated and the emotion he had in his films. There’s something about his camera work that’s very unique, and that’s what I like about him.”

2. Gus Van Sant

“Elephant is his best movie, but I have a very strong soft spot for Paranoid Park. I love how he injects violence into something very casual and mundane – when the kid is shot in Elephant or in the Paranoid Park death scene, it’s a shock to reality. The contrast between reality and violence is so big that it’s much more impressive than a Tarantino movie, where it’s all about the violence.”

3. Philip Glass

“When I was younger, I’d listen to a lot of soundtracks and I randomly fell on Philip Glass’ soundtrack for Koyaanisqatsi. The first time I listened to his music, I could feel emotions that were indescribable – it wasn’t pain, it wasn’t nostalgia, it wasn’t uplifting – the emotion that came out was very alien, in a way. I’ve always been fascinated by the power of music to create emotions.”

4. Michel Gondry

“I wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing if Gondry wasn’t a director. He made the videos I would see on TV – I think the first Michel Gondry video I saw was Bjork’s ‘Bachelorette’. I just remember watching them over and over, like I was studying them. But now, I feel like I’m getting closer to directors like Chris Cunningham or Spike Jonze because I’m getting more cinematic and less playful with what I do. I try to tell stories that are a little more realistic.”

5. Rap and hip-hop rhythms

“When I created my album, we sampled a lot of orchestral music but we built on patterns and structures that are actually from rap beats. Right now I’m fascinated by Kendrick Lamar; I was at his show a couple of days ago and I think he’s the best rapper out there right now. Of course I love Jay-Z, and I have a soft spot for Kanye – people forget he’s an amazing producer, and his connection with visuals is mind-blowing.”

***

ultima lui alegere n-ar fi pe lista mea:) dar eu as mai adauga Albastrul lui Kieslowski, fratii Wachowski, muzicile lui Zimmer si Tom Tykwe (ca sa ramin in zona filmelor), pe Wong Kar Wai, Akram Khan si… cred ca as mai adauga vreo citeva nume de domni pentru ca ziua mea sa aiba o transformare ABSOLUTA:)

daca ar fi sa-ti transformi ziua astazi, ce-ai face? din ce te-ai inspira?

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wachowskio lectie despre sa nu te dai batut(a)

o lectie despre sa nu te dai batut(a)

ii stiti pe fratii Wachowski, cei care au schimbat cinematografia cu Matrix. ati crede ca le e usor si ca pot avea orice pe lumea asta pentru proiectele lor.

data viitoare cind credeti ca nu va iese ceva pentru ca voi sunteti cei mai ghinionisti din lume, pentru ca sunteti mici si necunoscuti, amintiti-va ceea ce veti citi mai jos.

si dupa ce cititi, duceti-va sa vedeti filmul pentru care au muncit atit, Cloud Atlas.

ceea ce veti citi mai jos e o lectie buna despre daca ai incredere in ceea ce faci, daca faci cu pasiune si inteligenta , ai sa gasesti o cale sa-ti duci visul la capat. pentru ca nimanui nu-i e usor, doar ca unii persevereaza mai mult decit altii.

AVC: You spent years trying to get Cloud Atlas funded, while working on other projects. How do you maintain excitement for one project over such a long period, especially while working on other films?

AW: Well it’s extremely difficult.

LW: There’s three of us. That helps.

AW: We’re a collective. Whenever somebody’s down—or in this case, often two people were down, and the third always seemed to yell at us to keep going, “Get on your feet!” Sometimes we would all be down. There was this one period where we ended up saying, “Okay, this probably isn’t going to happen. But why don’t we read the script one more time. If there is any doubt in our minds, we’ll let it go.” And we all separately read the script, and we all separately had this elation from reading, and we were like, “Okay, we ought to give this one more chance.”

LW: The more we worked on it, the more intensely we loved it. To the point where there was this feeling, even after three years, that no matter what happened, somehow we were going to get this movie made. There would be huge, depressing setbacks and challenges where [financial backers] would say, “I’m in,” and then a month later, they would go, “I’m out.” And we’d say, “You can’t, we have a contract,” and they would say, “Sue us.” I mean, like, that kind of collapse.

AW: And this happened all the way up until the moment the actors were supposed to fly out to Berlin to start costuming.

LW: We were supposed to deposit money in their accounts, and we didn’t have it, because the bank wouldn’t close the loan, because suddenly we had—

AW: We had a financing gap with one of our investors, I think in Spain. Like, they went bankrupt. So we ended up putting our own money in.

LW: We had to put the houses up to bridge the gap. And we didn’t even—it wasn’t even a long discussion. It was instantaneous. We were going to make the movie. It was too close, it was too important, and really, we were too much in love with it. We would do anything for this movie.

AVC: What percentage of the budget did you end up having to put up yourself?

LW: Well, we waived all our fees—

AW: It’s complicated, because we have our companies that have put money into it, and then we also had to put money in personally.

LW: All over, we’re probably well over 10 percent of the budget.

AW: Close to 7 million bucks or something like that.

AVC: Did you have similar problems with the actors, as the financing years went on, where people agreed to be in it and then dropped out?

LW: Well, there were some actors who were a little terrified of the material and the idea of playing six parts. And a couple people chickened out. But in general, the actors who were committed were as ferociously and fearlessly committed as we were. They flew—even though their agents called them and said, “They don’t have the money, the money’s not closed”—

AW: Advising them not to fly, not to get on the plane—

LW: Every single time, Tom Hanks was the first who said, “I’m getting on the plane.” And then once he said he was getting on the plane, basically everyone said, “Well, Tom’s on the plane, we’re on the plane.” And so everyone flew [to Berlin to begin the film]. It was like this giant leap of faith. From all over the globe.

intregul interviu aici

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cloud-atlas-670despre structura celui mai spectaculos film al acestui an: Atlasul Norilor

despre structura celui mai spectaculos film al acestui an: Atlasul Norilor

De vineri intra pe ecrane Atlasul Norilor, un film despre care vom vorbi multa vreme: e scris si produs de fratii Wachowski – cei care au facut Matrix si e regizat impreuna cu domnul care a facut Run Lola Run,Tom Tykwer.

fiecare dintre cei trei a revolutionat lumea filmului cu limbajul sau cinematografic. pun pariu ca si de data aceasta ne vom uita de mai multe ori la film ca sa despicam firul in patru si sa parem destepti.

stiu cel putin 2 carti care au analizat matematic, filosofic si din perspectiva limbajului cinematografic Matrix ( pe una am si cumparat-o la vremea lansarii ei, dupa primul episod care a fost si cel mai bun din serie, dupa gustul meu)

mi-ar placea ca inainte de a merge sa vedeti filmul sa cititi un spectaculos story din NewYorker despre fratii Wachowski si munca lor la acest proiect. spun spectaculos, nu pentru ca are informatii scandaloase de tabloid, ci pentru ca intra cu decenta in intimitatea acestor doi oameni geniali ( unul dintre frati si-a schimbat sexul de la primul Matrix incoace, din Larry acum e Lana) si va arata viata lor, dar si cum au facut acest film.

unul dintre fragmentele mele preferate e cel care se refera la cit de greu a fost sa gaseasca o structura pentru film. intregul text aici

 

The main challenge was the novel’s convoluted structure: the chapters are ordered chronologically until the middle of the book, at which point the sequence reverses; the book thus begins and ends in the nineteenth century. This couldn’t work in a film. “It would be impossible to introduce a new story ninety minutes in,” Lana said.

The filmmakers’ initial idea was to establish a connective trajectory between Dr. Goose, a devious physician who may be poisoning Ewing, in the earliest story line, and Zachry, the tribesman on whose moral choices the future of civilization hinges, after the Fall. They had no idea what to do with all the other story lines and characters.

They broke the book down into hundreds of scenes, copied them onto colored index cards, and spread the cards on the floor, with each color representing a different character or time period. The house looked like “a Zen garden of index cards,” Lana said. At the end of the day, they’d pick up the cards in an order that they hoped would work as the arc of the film. Reading from the cards, Lana would then narrate the rearranged story. The next day, they’d do it again.

sper sa nu am treaba vineri dimineata ca sa pot fi printre primii spectatori.

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fl-cloud-atlas_510x383The Wachowskis (Matrix) are back!

The Wachowskis (Matrix) are back!

Fratii Wachowski – care au revolutionat cinema-ul cu Matrix – se intorc pe ecrane cu o adaptare dupa cartea “Cloud Atlas”. (Ii au in distributie pe Tom Hanks , Halle Berry, Susan Sarandon, Jim Broadbent, Hugh Grant, Hugo Weavin) Ca sa promoveze filmul, The New Yorker face un profil al celor doi frati – trecind de la ideea cartii si transformarea ei in scenariu, pe la schimbarea de sex a lui Larry – acum Lana, unul dintre frati, si mergind usor usor prin toata viata lor.

O demonstratie minunata de jurnalism. textul integral e aici, mai jos trei fragmente ca sa va conving sa cititi tot articolul care e lung:)

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***

The main challenge was the novel’s convoluted structure: the chapters are ordered chronologically until the middle of the book, at which point the sequence reverses; the book thus begins and ends in the nineteenth century. This couldn’t work in a film. “It would be impossible to introduce a new story ninety minutes in,” Lana said. The filmmakers’ initial idea was to establish a connective trajectory between Dr. Goose, a devious physician who may be poisoning Ewing, in the earliest story line, and Zachry, the tribesman on whose moral choices the future of civilization hinges, after the Fall. They had no idea what to do with all the other story lines and characters. They broke the book down into hundreds of scenes, copied them onto colored index cards, and spread the cards on the floor, with each color representing a different character or time period. The house looked like “a Zen garden of index cards,” Lana said. At the end of the day, they’d pick up the cards in an order that they hoped would work as the arc of the film. Reading from the cards, Lana would then narrate the rearranged story. The next day, they’d do it again.

***

Perhaps not coincidentally, Lana’s gender consciousness started to emerge at around the same time. In third grade, Larry transferred to a Catholic school, where boys and girls wore different uniforms and stood in separate lines before class. “I have a formative memory of walking through the girls’ line and hesitating, knowing that my clothes didn’t match,” Lana told me. “But as I continued on I felt I did not belong in the other line, so I just stopped in between them. I stood for a long moment with everyone staring at me, including the nun. She told me to get in line. I was stuck—I couldn’t move. I think some unconscious part of me figured I was exactly where I belonged: betwixt.” Larry was often bullied for his betwixtness. “As a result, I hid and found tremendous solace in books, vastly preferring imagined worlds to this world,” Lana said.

***

The blockbuster-film producer Dino De Laurentiis optioned the Wachowskis’ next screenplay, “Assassins,” while they were renovating their parents’ house. De Laurentiis entertained them with champagne and lascivious stories about beautiful actresses, and then sold the script to Warner Bros. for five times what he’d paid. According to Lana, substantial revisions by a hired writer removed “all the subtext, the visual metaphors . . . the idea that within our world there are moral pocket universes that operate differently.” When the movie was made, in 1995 (directed by Richard Donner, of “Lethal Weapon” fame, and starring Sylvester Stallone, Antonio Banderas, and Julianne Moore), the Wachowskis tried to get their names taken off the credits but failed. Still, the script earned them a deal with Warner Bros. They finished the work on their parents’ house, quit construction, and became full-time filmmakers

***
Filmul “Cloud Atlas” are premiera mondiala peste citeva zile la festivalul de film de la toronto si intra in cinematografele din toata lumea pe 26 octombrie

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